The 6Ps Of Mergers And Acquisitions With Michelle Seiler Tucker And The Story Behind The Rich Dad, Poor Dad Series With Sharon Lechter

TTL 823 Michelle Seiler Tucker | Mergers And Acquisitions

The 6Ps Of Mergers And Acquisitions With Michelle Seiler Tucker And The Story Behind The Rich Dad, Poor Dad Series With Sharon Lechter

Do you know that you have to think about your exit strategy from day one of starting or buying your business? Dr. Diane Hamilton‘s guest is Michelle Seiler Tucker, a 20-year veteran in the Merger and Acquisition (M&A) industry. Many business owners think of selling their business when it’s going on a downward spiral. But who will buy a failing business? In this episode, Michelle explains why the best time to sell your business is when it’s in its prime. You have to figure out what your endgame is and start from there. What’s more, Michelle shares with you the 6Pthat you need to know to make sure your business is sellable: people, product, process, proprietary, patrons, and profit. If you want to make your business sellable from day one, then this episode is for you! 

 —

Chances are you’ve heard of Rich Dad, Poor Dad, because who hasn’t? Dr. Diane Hamilton’s guest is Sharon Lechter, the co-author of the hugely impactful book with the legendary Robert Kiyosaki. In this episode, Sharon shares her journey of writing the book and how it evolved into a whole series targeted at different age groups. Sharon says that there are three things you need to pay attention to as an author: your book, your platform, and your ability to communicate. With the technology we have today, authors have tremendous opportunities to succeed. Join in the conversation to learn valuable insights on how you can be a successful author like Sharon! 

Continue reading “The 6Ps Of Mergers And Acquisitions With Michelle Seiler Tucker And The Story Behind The Rich Dad, Poor Dad Series With Sharon Lechter”

Boomer Entrepreneurs Can’t Retire

 

One of the things entrepreneurs plan for is the time that they will eventually sell their company.  Currently many older business owners have found it difficult to reap the anticipated rewards of retirement. As the author of the Entrepreneur Exit Strategies for your Business pointed out, “it’s not enough to build a business worth a fortune; you have to make sure you have an exit strategy, a way to get the money back out.” If businesses were once very successful, the economy may have impacted their current worth.  Even with what may once have been considered a strong exit strategy, plans may have been affected by the economic downturn.

Boomers trying to sell their businesses are receiving offers that are not enough to finance their retirement.  In the Wall Street Journal article The Economy Stole My Retirement, it noted that one small business owner expected to sell for $2 million but recent losses from the recession has made that impossible.  She now has seen offers as low as $250,000.

Business owners who had planned to travel and relax in their golden years are now spending 10-12 hours a day or more working to salvage companies.  Some have no foreseeable chance of selling in the future.  Many have put all of their money into their businesses and would have to live only on social security if they let the businesses fail.

While it is admirable to have high expectations for an entrepreneurial venture, it is the wise business owner who does not keep all of his or her eggs in one basket.  Just as Enron employees learned the hard way, it is not a good idea to have all of your money invested in the company in which you work.  If the company goes under, people not only lose their jobs but their life savings as well.

Related Articles: