The Spiritual Global Movement For Women with Sister Jenna and Intensifying Your Value Proposition with Lynda Spiegel

TTL 276 | Women Empowerment

The Spiritual Global Movement For Women with Sister Jenna and Intensifying Your Value Proposition with Lynda Spiegel

We all have a special calling in our life. While many of us struggle to discern our role in the world, Sister Jenna, found her calling very early on. Sister Jenna is a spiritual leader, author, radio and TV personality, renowned speaker, and founder of the Meditation Museum. Not wanting to be subjugated by society’s norms about women, she dove into entrepreneurship and business, bought her first nightclub at the age of 21, and made successful investments. Sister Jenna says having a spiritual awakening makes you see beyond the physical that you start to look more into the intentionality of your thoughts, words, and choices. Sister Jenna talks about spirituality, the Meditation Museum, and her global movement for women empowerment.

 

We can sum up what HR professionals are looking for in a resume in three simple words: your value proposition. Job search coach and resume writer Lynda Spiegel says when you’re posting jobs and you get a gazillion resumes, you have to search for what this person does and what this person’s potential value is to you. Lynda gives the lowdown on what HR professionals are really looking for and shares some valuable advice on what people can do with their resumes and how to make themselves stand out.

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Update Your Resume for the New Year

 

One New Year’s resolution to consider is to update your resume.  Whether you are in job-search mode or have been with a job for a while, it is always good to be prepared.  The job market is constantly changing and people sometimes lose jobs that they had considered solid.

I recommend checking out the Ragan article 10 Words or Phrases That Shouldn’t be on Your Résumé. I like that the author mentioned the importance of not simply listing the word experienced. “Although you may have many years working in a certain field, don’t sell yourself short by using a word as vague and general as “experienced.” Get specific. Make a note of how long you’ve worked in a certain industry, how many clients you’ve had, what your sales were, and how much you increased profitability. Employers want to see results, not fluff.”

I have had to review many resumes that were sloppy, complicated, and just difficult to decipher. Due to a wealth of information on the Internet, there is no excuse for having a poor resume.

I recommend checking out some of the following links:

It is also simple to create a resume within a Word document.  To find templates, go to the file dropdown menu and pick new.  In the search bar, type in the word: resume.  This will bring up a list of free templates that can be easily modified.

Related Articles:

Using QR Codes to Get a Job or Promote Your Business

You probably have seen QR codes and don’t even realize it.  Perhaps they were on a marketing ad or a flyer someone handed you.  You might have seen them on a promotional piece or on a poster at a local store.  It may have looked so under-stated that you probably passed right by it and didn’t give it a second thought.

Start looking for them.  You’ll be surprised at how many places are using them.  What are they?  Think of them like a bar code that lists a lot more information and can direct you to specific websites.  Companies are creating these codes to be used with smartphone apps.  This is an example code that I created for my book, It’s Not You It’s Your Personality:

It’s really simple to make one.  You can go to a site like Qurify.com and type in the information you want to be encoded.  It may be something as simple as a website address.  You can go to the Qurify site and type in your website URL address. If you don’t have a website, consider putting in your Linkedin profile page.   Click on the Qurify button and then download the image it creates as a jpeg file.  Now you can take this file and put it on your business cards, on your resume, or on any other information you create. 

Anyone who has a QR Reader app on their phone can simply start the app on their phone and point it at your code.  When they do that, they will be directed on their phone to the URL address you entered on Qurify.  It couldn’t be easier. 

This can really make you stand out from the rest in the job search.  Just having that code on your resume will make those that don’t know what it is, look into it why it is on your resume.  For those that do know what it is, they will appreciate how technologically you savvy are.

If you have your own business and want to promote different parts of your website, these can be useful as well.  To show examples, I created several of these QR codes for Dr. Robert Spies’ plastic surgery site.  To see how they work, first download a free QR Reader app onto your smartphone.  Then open that app and point it at the codes listed below.

This code directs you to information about facelifts:

This code directs you to information about tummy tucks:

 This code directs you to information about breast augmentation:

 By having different QR codes like this, you can customize your marketing material to direct people to the appropriate websites.  For companies like a plastic surgery practice, this can be a very effective tool to target people that have a strong enough financial background to own a smartphone as well as those that are interested enough to point their phone at the code for more information.  It is a great tool to specifically target the appropriate population. 

To find out more about how these codes work, check out information from the guys at how stuff works technology podcast. 

2011 Top 10 Things You Should Not Put On Your Resume

image via google.com

In a tough economy, many people are trying to perfect their resumes.  It is a very competitive market out there, with many competing for the few coveted jobs.  It is important not to make the mistake of including inappropriate information in your resume or cover letter as this is the first thing that companies use to judge you.

I read an interesting article about whether you should include your MBTI and IQ results on your resume.  AskaManager.com didn’t think this was a good idea explaining, “Resumes are for listing your accomplishments; they’re not for personal traits. Listing that you’re an “ESTJ” does give me some information about you, but it doesn’t tell me what you’ve achieved and experienced, which is what I’m looking for when I look at your resume.” 

This made me think about all of the resumes I’ve screened that had inappropriate information listed on them.  Here is my top list of things you should never include on your resume:

  1. Age, weight, height, religion, race, political affiliation, pets, marital status and other personal information
  2. Salary requirements
  3. Inappropriate email names (example:  Toosexy at blahblah.com)
  4. Medical issues
  5. High School Information, High School Memberships
  6. Photograph
  7. Personal negative feelings about a position or employer
  8. Hobbies or activities that imply religious affiliation
  9. IQ, EQ, Personality Results, Mensa, GPA
  10. Overly large or busy fonts and colors on resume and cover page

Some career sites note that the objective and reference sections are not a good addition.  I don’t personally think those are as much of a problem.  In fact, I think an objective statement can help if a person’s past jobs aren’t in line with the job they are hoping to obtain. Including the phrase “References Available Upon Request” is still acceptable although not required.  It is not correct to actually list the people being used as references unless they are requested.

Optimizing Your Resume Using Keywords on Sites Like LinkedIn

In my book: How to Reinvent Your Career, I give a lot of tips about how to get an interview and obtain a job. Part of being successful in the interview process is to have a strong resume. Keywords are a big part of getting your resume noticed.

You may hear a lot about using keywords when optimizing websites. Now that sites like LinkedIn are increasing their searching capabilities, you may want to revisit how you have worded your online experience to be sure you are including appropriate buzz or key words. Employmentdigest.net suggests the following:

1. Go to web sites that represent companies and associations related to the candidate’s target industry in search of other buzzwords.

2. Search LinkedIn profiles of users who have similar jobs to see what keywords they’re using.

3. Go to association websites to see what keywords other industry professionals have used.

The specific words employers seek relate to the skills and experiences that demonstrate your experience with the skills necessary to do the job. Both hard and soft skills will fall in this category. Industry- and job-specific skills are almost always included in keyword lists. Highly technical fields can also include specific jargon or terms that demonstrate subject expertise. Job titles, certifications, types of degrees, college names and company names also demonstrate an applicant’s qualifications. Awards and professional organizations can also be considered strong keywords.

Have You Updated Your Job Skills?

In my book How to Reinvent Your Career, I write about taking a skills inventory. It’s important to look at how things have changed since you last made a career move, and decide whether you’ve kept up with the changes around you. Are you lacking some important skills? I recommend assessing your skills inventory and deciding whether you need to get some training in some of the following areas:

  1. Computer use
  2. Networking
  3. Interview performance
  4. Job Hunting
  5. Communication
  6. Analytical research
  7. Adaptability
  8. Diversity awareness
  9. Leadership
  10. Planning/goal setting
  11. Problem solving
  12. Teamwork
  13. Multi-tasking
  14. People skills
  15. Self-reliance

Remember that these are all important skills that employers are going to be looking for in prospective employees. Remember to highlight your abilities in each of these areas when writing your résumé.

Six Tips That Will Get You A Better Job

In a recent article by EmploymentDigest.net, the author gave 6 tips that will get you a better job. These include: converting things you love into a career, having people refer you, improving your resume, improving your skills, getting certified, and looking for more possibilities.

I agree that these things are important.  In fact I included these tips and more in my book How to Reinvent Your Career: Make More Money Doing What You Love.  If you are considering changing careers, one of the biggest mistakes you can make is to let opportunities to meet people pass you by.  I would like to add 6 more tips to the list he suggested. Here are some things to consider when you are out and about:

  1. Talk to people you would normally not talk to at stores and while you wait in lines to buy things.  Avoid the creepy or scary people of course.  But choose those that look like they may have something in common with you or are dressed in garb that you would like to wear for the type of job interest you have in mind.  By talking to people, you open up the opportunity to exchange information and expand your connections.
  2. Always have a supply of your business cards with you.  If you don’t work for a company, print up some simple contact information cards with your email, phone and any website or social networking information that you would like to share.
  3. Have an unusual way of being remembered.  I used to print my business card on stickers and attach them to the top of an Altoids box of mints.  I would give those away to customers that I wanted to have them remember me.  Think of little things you can do to be remembered in people’s minds and present them to people you meet that you would like to work for or do business with in the future.
  4. Do something for someone else.  If you help people, they will want to help you.  If there is an industry you want to be in, find someone in it to help.  I know a lot of people want to be pharmaceutical representatives, for example.  If they submit your resume, they get paid a finder’s fee.  Find out what is in it “for them” to have someone refer you.
  5. Remove any damaging information from the Internet that could hurt your chances of being hired.  Remember that fun weekend you posted on Facebook?  So will the person interviewing you if it is available out there.
  6. If you get an interview with someone that you can research online, do your homework.  Find out all you can about them that is complimentary or interesting.  People like to talk about themselves.  It also shows you cared enough to find out more about them or their company.

Changing Jobs – Be Sure You Have the Right Skills

It’s important to look at how things have changed since you last made a career move, and decide whether you’ve kept up with the changes around you. Are you lacking some important skills? I recommend assessing your skills inventory and deciding whether you need to get some training in some of the following areas:
  1. Computer use
  2. Networking
  3. Interview performance
  4. Job Hunting
  5. Communication
  6. Analytical research
  7. Adaptability
  8. Diversity awareness
  9. Leadership
  10. Planning/goal setting
  11. Problem solving
  12. Teamwork
  13. Multi-tasking
  14. People skills
  15. Self-reliance

 Remember that these are all important skills that employers are going to be looking for in prospective employees. Remember to highlight your abilities in each of these areas when writing your résumé.