Cracking the Curiosity Code: The Key to Unlocking Human Potential – An interview with Dr. Diane Hamilton

Cracking the Curiosity Code: The Key to Unlocking Human Potential – An interview with Dr. Diane Hamilton

The following is a guest blog post from by Ton Dobbe – Chief Inspiration Officer, Value Inspiration

Every week I interview entrepreneurs and experts from around the world to share their big idea about new forms of value creation and the potential we can unlock when technology augments the unique strengths of people to deliver remarkable impact.

Continue reading “Cracking the Curiosity Code: The Key to Unlocking Human Potential – An interview with Dr. Diane Hamilton”

TTL 251 | Inspiring Conversations

Environment And Humanity with Vanessa Tyler and Inspiring Conversations with Kristin Arnold

Emmy Award-winning and multi-Emmy nominated news anchor and host, Vanessa Tyler, talks to us about writing and her journey towards becoming big in the industry. Taking us back to Harlem, she shares how motivation is driven by a person’s environment. Vanessa recalls about how the people who surrounded her helped protect her dream and curiosity. She believes that each of us has the power to inspire and motivate others with our dreams as well. Vanessa provides some insights on overcoming adversity and moving past the struggles that will continuously come your way.

 

As the 2018 Smart Meetings Award Winner, meeting innovator Kristin Arnold provides great information on conducting discussions that are far from the lazy format of usual panels. Kristin talks about inspiring conversations by giving out strategic questions and provides tips on moderating your panels in the future. She also gives insights on how to deal with the different people attending the panel, showing how at the end of the day, it is not about you but the people who attend.

Continue reading “Environment And Humanity with Vanessa Tyler and Inspiring Conversations with Kristin Arnold”

Using Personality Assessment to Ace the Job Interview

 

Showing up to a job interview without researching the company’s background, products and future potential is an error many job applicants make.  Even those who have properly researched the company may still make the mistake of not assessing the interviewer’s needs. There are some important tips that job-seekers can utilize to ace the interview even if they are not made aware of who will interview them ahead of time.

Job candidates need to keep in mind that people like to receive information based on their personality preferences.  In an interview situation, that means that the job-seeker needs to assess the interviewer’s personality to look for clues about these preferences.

Based on the following personality types, tailor how information is delivered in the following way:

Interviewer is an Introvert (they prefer to think about what they want to say before they say it):  They may not want a lot of chit chat. Allow them to have time to ask questions and don’t talk over them.

Interviewer is an Extrovert (they tend to say what they are thinking without processing first):  Realize they require information quickly and may talk over you or end sentences for you.  If they ask a question and you need more time, simply say something like, “That is a good question; let me think about that for a moment.”  That will buy you some time to formulate your answer.

Interviewer is Direct (they prefer to get to the point and may be abrasive): Don’t hem and haw around.  Get right to the bottom line information they require.

Interviewer is Structured (they like facts and figures):  If they have charts and graphs around and ask for statistics, give them data.  They like quantifiable answers.

One way to find out more about the person doing the interview is to look around the office for clues.  Try to find things that you have in common with them.  Show an interest in the things they showcase like pictures, plaques, awards, etc.  For more information about acing the interview, read 10 Most Important Steps to Obtain a Dream Job.

Related Articles

Are Employers Trying to Trick You In the Interview? Helpful Answer to a Popular Difficult Question

 

There is a lot of advice about how to ace the job interview.  The book, How to Reinvent Your Career, lists many helpful tools, site links and examples to help with this.

One of the main things that employers want to find out is if you are a positive person that has the ability to overcome challenges.  Jobs.AOL.com had an interesting article about how to answer questions about your greatest weakness.  Some may look at these questions as tricks in order to get you to say something negative about yourself.  Others may look at these types of questions and answers as a sort of game.

Jobs.AOL did give some good advice about how to handle these types of questions. They suggested that it might not be a good idea to say your greatest weakness is that you work too hard.  They also thought it is not a good idea to say you don’t have any weaknesses.  So how do you answer this without looking weak?  They suggest, “Pick a real weakness from your occupational tool set that you know has no bearing on the job you are interviewing for. The interviewer will acknowledge that you were honest with them, and will likely consider your “greatest weakness” to be meaningless to him. You should also mention that you are studying or taking a class to improve in this area. For example, a computer programmer might say that she wishes to improve her public speaking skills and is attending Toastmasters for training. By including your plan for overcoming this “weakness,” you have actually turned your answer into a pseudo-strength: You recognize your faults and set a plan for self-improvement. A very good quality.”

How to Ace the Job Interview by Understanding Introverts and Extroverts

For those of you who have taken a Myers-Briggs MBTI personality assessment, you may already know if you are an introvert or extrovert.  It gets confusing to some as many say extrovert.  Myers-Briggs uses the term extravert.  What is important is that you understand the differences between how introverts and extroverts/extraverts prefer to process information.  Why is this important to acing the job inteview?  Watch the video below for more answers.

Employers Using Skype for Interviews

If you are looking for a job right now, you may be surprised to find out that your interview could occur through video-related software such as Skype.  In order to reduce costs, many employers are doing more and more through the use of video.  It works out well for both parties.  The prospective employee may actually be able to do their job interviews from home. 

If you are going to be interviewed in this manner, be sure you are prepared.   For a great article on how to prepare for your interview on Skype, check out the following by e.how.com:

Succeeding in a Skype interview takes as much preparation, if not more, than a regular interview.

Succeeding in a Skype interview takes as much preparation, if not more, than a regular interview.
Skype.com
User-Submitted Article

With companies slashing expenses in every which way these days, many are now preferring to interview job candidates online using applications such as Skype. With face to face interaction still intact, hiring managers can eliminate the costs associated with flying out candidates while maintaining the considerable benefits of having a face-to-face conversation.

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • A computer equipped with a webcam, microphone, and Skype
  • Appropriate interview attire
  • As isolated room with adequate lighting, lacking any distractions
  1. First, remember this is a REAL interview! Do not be tricked into thinking that preparation is not required since the interview will be done online. Though there are some tricks to Skype interviews listed below that are not available in an on-site interview, hiring managers will still be choosing individuals that they perceive as most qualified for the job. Thus, PREPARE for the interview in advance. Call the company or asking the hiring manager what would be the appropriate dress for the interview for you to best fit in with the company’s culture (if you do not know already).
  2. If possible, test out your computer set-up days before the interview is set to take place. If possible, use an ethernet cable to access the web; relying on Wi-Fi during an interview is a risk that should be avoided at all costs. Also, make sure there is plenty of lighting in the room, so that the hiring manager can clearly see your face. Free the room of any unnecessary distractions (for instance, a red umbrella or green coat hanging in the background), but it is okay for there to leave non-distracting objects up (such as a clock, a table, etc.). Test the call with another friend to make sure no minor details need to be adjusted (such as the distance between you and the screen).
  3. Try to get the computer’s webcam high enough so that it is eye-level with you. Some laptops naturally require the user to look down at the camera, and that look is typically not as flattering for an interview as the eye-level approach. This can be achieved by a variety of creative means, but if you have some sort of laptop or computer stand, that would be best.
  4. Get there early! Log onto Skype approximately 15 minutes before the interview start time. If the hiring manager is already online, they will be impressed that you have shown up for this virtual interview early. If not, they will still notice you were already online when they got on.
  5. Be professional, but be yourself! Don’t get nervous; demonstrating confidence can sometimes be one of the deciding factors to who the company chooses for the job. Try not to refer to notes (see tip below), however, feel free to write down anything the interviewer might say. Also, it is appropriate to look at the video feed of the interviewer while they are talking, however, it is imperative that you speak to them by looking at the webcam. This will give the impression of eye contact, which is a major selling point in any interview.

Dr. Diane Hamilton is Interviewed by Dean Voelker

Click the date link to hear the audio file. Please be patient for the file to load in your media player.

  • 07/31/2010 – Dr. Diane Hamilton (Current Show)
  •       click this link to hear the show

    Dr. Diane Hamilton

    Click on the above link and go about five minutes into the show to listen to Financial Talk Show Host and Author, Dean Voelker, interview Dr. Diane Hamilton about young adults, money, online learning, careers, and even Lady Gaga. . . Stay tuned until the end to hear more about Diane’s books: The Online Student’s User Manual, How to Reinvent Your Career and Ten Things The Young Adult Needs to Know to Be Financially Savvy.

    Dean Voelker Interviews Dr. Diane Hamilton

    WHME-FM Radio Show

    Listen to Dean on WHME 103.3 FM for Improving Your Financial Health “Improving Your Financial Health”
    Listen to this Radio Program
    with Dean Voelker, AAMS
    on WHME-FM in South Bend, IN
    Saturdays at 9:00am EST
    Click Here: 2010 Archived Shows

    Upcoming Show – “Improving Your Financial Health”

  • –>07/31/2010 – Dr. Diane Hamilton (Upcoming Show)
    My guest this week is Dr. Diane Hamilton – www.drdianehamilton.com. Diane has a Doctorate in Business Management and currently teaches business courses for six online universities. Along with her teaching experience, she has more than 25 years of business and management experience. Dr. Hamilton has also written several books and articles which focus on understanding online education, and personal finance for young adults. Her most recent book, Ten Things Young Adults Need to Know to be Financially Savvy is designed to teach young adults basic principles of personal finance. The unique and innovative style of the book engages young readers to learn about money management, home-buying and other areas of personal finance in an entertaining and personal way that is far from the typical dull text available on the subject. Please join me for a lively discussion with Dr. Diane Hamilton as we talk about how to keep young people better informed.
  • Dr. Diane Hamilton

    My interview with Dean will be on Saturday’s show and you can also check back on Dean’s site at www.helpmy401k.us for the actual interview file if you miss it.

    Changing Jobs – Be Sure You Have the Right Skills

    It’s important to look at how things have changed since you last made a career move, and decide whether you’ve kept up with the changes around you. Are you lacking some important skills? I recommend assessing your skills inventory and deciding whether you need to get some training in some of the following areas:
    1. Computer use
    2. Networking
    3. Interview performance
    4. Job Hunting
    5. Communication
    6. Analytical research
    7. Adaptability
    8. Diversity awareness
    9. Leadership
    10. Planning/goal setting
    11. Problem solving
    12. Teamwork
    13. Multi-tasking
    14. People skills
    15. Self-reliance

     Remember that these are all important skills that employers are going to be looking for in prospective employees. Remember to highlight your abilities in each of these areas when writing your résumé.

    13 Illegal Interview Questions: Do you know what to do?

     Editor Notes: Most Job Seekers have no idea what an Illegal Interview question sounds like. Here is a list of 13 questions that a job interviewer should not be asking you. Remember the purpose of an interview is to get the job. So it is important that you understand how to answer even inappropriate interview questions.
    13 Sample Illegal and Legal Interview via internsover40.blogspot.com

    In my book How to Reinvent Your Career I write about interview questions you should be prepared to answer. Remember that there are some things that should not be asked in an interview. I think this writer has an interesting take on this situation. . . however, be sure you know that no one can ask you directly about your:

    Race
    Color
    Sex
    Religion
    National origin
    Birthplace
    Age
    Disability
    Marital/family status

    For more advice about how to handle these questions, check out an additional article by Monster by clicking here.