Using Personality Assessment to Ace the Job Interview

Using Personality Assessment to Ace the Job Interview

 

Showing up to a job interview without researching the company’s background, products and future potential is an error many job applicants make.  Even those who have properly researched the company may still make the mistake of not assessing the interviewer’s needs. There are some important tips that job-seekers can utilize to ace the interview even if they are not made aware of who will interview them ahead of time.

Job candidates need to keep in mind that people like to receive information based on their personality preferences.  In an interview situation, that means that the job-seeker needs to assess the interviewer’s personality to look for clues about these preferences.

Based on the following personality types, tailor how information is delivered in the following way:

Interviewer is an Introvert (they prefer to think about what they want to say before they say it):  They may not want a lot of chit chat. Allow them to have time to ask questions and don’t talk over them.

Interviewer is an Extrovert (they tend to say what they are thinking without processing first):  Realize they require information quickly and may talk over you or end sentences for you.  If they ask a question and you need more time, simply say something like, “That is a good question; let me think about that for a moment.”  That will buy you some time to formulate your answer.

Interviewer is Direct (they prefer to get to the point and may be abrasive): Don’t hem and haw around.  Get right to the bottom line information they require.

Interviewer is Structured (they like facts and figures):  If they have charts and graphs around and ask for statistics, give them data.  They like quantifiable answers.

One way to find out more about the person doing the interview is to look around the office for clues.  Try to find things that you have in common with them.  Show an interest in the things they showcase like pictures, plaques, awards, etc.  For more information about acing the interview, read 10 Most Important Steps to Obtain a Dream Job.

Related Articles

Is Facebook and Twitter Keeping You Out of College or Helping You Get In?

Employers often use Google or other online research sites to find out about prospective job applicants. If there is embarrassing or incriminating information out there, it may not just be prospective employers that find it. 

Universities are also performing online searches on prospective students. According to Latimes, “College admissions officials look up applicants on Facebook and Twitter, experts say. Details revealed through social media can make or break a good impression.”

Keep in mind, social media can be a way to have employers and universities find out good things about you as well.  In the Latimes article the editor of StudentAdvisor “suggests following the school’s Twitter feed or “liking” its Facebook fan page. Students also can post a video resume on YouTube or blog about volunteering efforts or other extracurricular activities and provide a link on their applications.”

For more information, check out the Online Reputation Guide

Online Reputation Guide for College-Bound Students

Be Your Own “Dream Career” Advocate, Reinvent Your Social Network

Phoenix AZ—November 11, 2010— Guidance is a powerful thing and an important thing to seek from all sources when considering career change.  In her new book, How to Reinvent Your Career, Dr. Diane Hamilton does just that. She guides her readers through the process of self-promotion, something truly essential for landing that “dream” job.

Dr.  Hamilton has been advising her students regarding career opportunities for 5 years. She wants them to be marketable, relevant to the times and ultimately successful.  However, this isn’t any job hunt. This is a reinvention. Readers are using Diane’s tools to find complete job satisfaction.  The number one rule is when interviewing for a dream job is to understand the ability of how to show prospective employers   the benefits (not to be confused with features) that you offer.

Dr. Hamilton points out that Linked-in.com can be thought of as the Facebook for professionals. It is a way to get “connected” or “linked-in” with people online.   New users can create a profile showcasing their unique abilities and strengths. Some may see it as an online resume but it is so much more than that, as it can be tailored to emphasize your strengths and assets and be used to interact with potential connections.

“Networking is not contrived cocktail parties anymore,” says Hamilton, “The future is online—and that should not be a scary place. To stay current, you have to create your ‘brand,’ the heart of your profile, online.”

Once the profile is complete, it’s time to connect!  It must be continually updated to obtain the maximum benefit.  Just joining is not enough.  You must actively participate for optimal success.  Anytime a user gathers someone’s business card, it is crucial to connect with him or her the next day.  Linked-in is a way to keep a database of people who could be mutually beneficial contacts for the duration of the user’s entire career.

For job seekers Linked-in is partially about staying current, but most importantly a way to show not only skills but benefits: the total package. When changing careers it is vital to self-promote, showing that you are more than a set of skills but an asset to the team at that “dream job.”

“Link-in” with Dr. Diane Hamilton: www.linkedin.com/in/drdianehamilton

PR Contact:
Rebecca Crowley, RTC Publicity
646-619-1178
rebecca@rtcpublicity.com


drdianehamilton.com

How to Prepare For Employment Tests

Many companies are testing their potential future employees. What can do you do to be sure you ace those tests? It helps if there is a way to find out what type of test they will be administering. If you know someone who works for the company, they may be able to tell you. When I was applying to be a pharmaceutical representative in the 80s, they gave me a personality test where I had to chose from groups of words that I would use to describe me and from words I would think others would use to describe me. Today, there are a lot more tests out there and it can be a challenge to find out which ones are being used.

The Washington Post had some advice for the job applicant faced with taking a test. Some of the advice they gave were to find out details about the test, search online for practice tests to try ahead of time, try not to over-analyze the questions, don’t get freaked out if you just simply can’t remember something, and ask for your results so that you can improve on areas where you didn’t do as well.

It is important to realize that testing is becoming part of the norm.  According to Forbes, “Psychological scrutiny and rigorous simulations are fast becoming a requisite part of the interview process. Gone are the days when a clutch golf swing or well-schmoozed dinner might score you a spot in the C-suite. The downturn has shed a decidedly unflattering light on subjective hiring practices. Even the standard application-interview-résumé-and-reference-check formula has come under fire for being too soft and unreliable.” 

To try out some free aptitude and employment tests, check out:

http://www.jobtestprep.co.uk/jtpsite/content/en-GB/3/chooseTrial.aspx

http://www.careerpath.com/

http://sjlibrary.org/research%5Cweb/iguide_subjectList.htm?t=36&catID=1095