Companies Jump through Hoops to Please Millennials

Companies Jump through Hoops to Please Millennials

Sixty Minutes did a great show on the millennial generation titled The Millennials Are Coming.  In that report, they explained how Generation Y or millennials are unique in their expectations at work.

The Wall Street Journal’s article Firms Bow to Generation Y’s Demands continues to explore how companies are offering incentives and jumping through hoops to keep millennials happy.  This has become a problem for older employees who feel this is inappropriate.

Companies are bowing to younger generations’ needs because, “they bring fresh skills to the workplace: they’re tech-savvy, racially diverse, socially interconnected, and collaborative. Moreover, companies need to keep employee pipelines full as baby boomers entire retirement.”

Companies like Aprimo are dangling the carrot of the probability of a one-year promotion to attract talent.  Their OnTrack program, launched in 2005, has had 100% of participates receive promotions and increased salaries within a year.

Companies are witnessing personality conflicts within the workplace because boomers may view that millennials receive special treatment.  “Boomers often gripe about their younger colleagues as arrogant kids who don’t know how to dress appropriately, deal with customers or close deals.”

The key to handling multiple generations within the workplace may revolve around understanding individual personality preferences. To find out more about personality types in the workplace check out:  It’s Not You It’s Your Personality:  Skills to Survive and Thrive in the Modern Workplace.

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Women Dominating Sales Positions

 

Women are becoming a dominant force in sales positions.  In the article 10 Most Lucrative Industries for Women it was noted, “A recent study found that women are coming to dominate certain areas of sales, a traditionally lucrative field for those who excel. In fact, the study seemed to show that women tend to have better selling skills than men, translating into substantial earnings for saleswomen.”

When women were asked what their top 10 more desired sales careers would be, they chose:

1.    Pharmaceutical Sales

2.    Biotech Sales

3.    Dental Sales

4.    Insurance Sales

5.    Healthcare Sales

6.    IT Sales

7.    Medical Sales

8.    Advertising Sales

9.    Medical Equipment Sales

10.  Real Estate Sales

This is good news for women in the current questionable economy. Monster reported, “In 2010, more employers were willing to invest in their sales forces, having some faith that customers could be cajoled into buying. In October 2010 there were 145,000 more workers employed in sales and related occupations than a year earlier.”

For additional resources about women and sales positions, check out some of the following links:

Women Turning to Cosmetic Sales

Community of Women in Professional Sales

50 Best Careers of 2011

Sales Jobs for Women Search Site

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Female Career Choices That May Surprise You

On the first day of work as a pharmaceutical representative in the 80’s, I was struck by the similarity of my newly-hired peers.  There were about 10 of us that started at the same time.  Nine out of 10 of us were women.  I hadn’t given much thought as to whether women dominated in the pharmaceutical business at that time.  However, sitting at that long table full of women, most of whom had business degrees, made me realize that things were changing for women and their career choices.

Since I currently teach for many different online universities, a recent article about women and their online degree choices caught my eye.  In the article 10 Majors That Are No longer Male-Dominated, the author pointed out, “Historically, women have dominated majors like education, English and psychology, while men were more likely to study engineering, computer science or math. Although this may ring true at some schools, it isn’t the standard at every traditional or online college. More than ever, college women are opting to study traditionally male-dominated majors and are breaking enrollment records while they’re at it. As the line between male- and female-dominated academic fields continues to fade, there will be less segregation in the job market and more opportunities for both sexes.”

The article lists the following online majors as currently female-dominant:

Computer Science

Business

Engineering

Agriculture

Biological Science

Construction Management

Fire Science

Criminal Justice

Information Technology

Sports Management

For more information about the increase in women majoring in each of these areas, click here to read the full article.

Baby Boomers Turn 65 This Year: Keeping the Illusion of Youth While Staying Healthy

This year the oldest baby boomers will turn 65.  If you call a baby boomer “elderly”, you might find that is not a term they take lightly.  The days of older generations taking it easy and moving to quiet communities have faded.  This is a very proud group that wants to remain vital and active for as long as possible.

Although boomers may not have noticed it, marketers are using subtle targeting methods to reach this group without insulting them. Some companies are using larger typefaces and avoiding colors that are hard to distinguish between to allow for their packaging to be distinct to older eyes.  If aging boomers haven’t realized their clothing size may remaind the same, while their body size increases, they may not be aware that clothing companies are doing something called vanity sizing.  Although not necessarily unique to only boomers, Mesh.com reported, “Gap, the parent company of Banana Republic, was contacted to ask about the new double-zero size. They said they’re responding to the demands of their customers. They said women want smaller sizes.”

Boomers may dress for success still but father time is creeping up on them.  Companies are doing their best to allow boomers to age gracefully, keeping their dignity intact.  WJS.com reported, “Kimberly-Clark spent two years overhauling its Depend brand, anticipating boomers would demand changes to the image and design of a line long considered too diaper-like and institutional. By 2020, Kimberly-Clark expects 45 million boomers will need incontinence products, up from 38 million currently.”

Those not ready for diapers, are not ready to sit on the porch swing and rock either.  In the past, retired generations paid off their mortgages to live their twilight years free of debt.  Boomers may be downsizing but many plan to move into new homes.  “A big driver of boomers’ increased spending is the fact that over one-third plan to move to a new home within five years of becoming empty nesters.”

Boomers may not be retiring as early either.  The stock market crisis is partly to blame, but there are other reasons.   Another issue facing this generation is that they often have to not only care for their children but their own aging parents.  They have often been called the sandwich generation because of this.  US News Money reported, “Almost a third (31 percent) of relatively wealthy Americans are supporting older and younger immediate family members at the same time, according to a new Merrill Lynch Wealth Management survey of 1,000 people with investable assets of $250,000 or more.” The stress from this has caused many boomers to have difficulty with their jobs and health, leading to a generation that experiences higher rates of depression.

RetirementBoomerStyle listed some recommendations for this generation and how to stay as healthy as possible, “So, while baby boomers are caring for the health of their family, they should keep themselves in mind as well. A diet that is high in fiber is ideal for the baby boomer, and including lean meats in the diet will provide the protein that is needed for energy and muscle toning. Baby boomer women should also considered taking a supplement that includes omega-3 fatty acids; this will improve memory and brain function, and make it easier for the body to fight off free radicals. In addition to taking supplements, women should also be sure to eat some form of fatty fish each week, such as salmon or tuna. Men of this generation should be sure to eat foods that are rich in lycopene, a substance that can reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Lycopene can be found in foods like tomatoes and watermelon, so eating these fruits fresh a few times a week can make a big difference when it comes to preventative health.”

Living Full after 40 Host Anna Banks Interviews Dr. Diane Hamilton

Living Fully After 40 rss itune

LivingFullyAfter40

Living Fully after 40 is a talk show created to build a community of women to address the spiritual, emotional and psychological dimensions of midlife transition for women. Living Fully after 40 provides an opportunity for women in midlife to embrace challenge and examine their lives, careers and relationships in a supportive community. Living Fully after 40 features conversations with experts who empower women in crafting a future overflowing with tremendous possibilities – and making midlife the richest, most insightful and rewarding years of all.

Few Women in Management

Women made little progress in climbing into management positions in this country even in the boom years before the financial crisis, according to a report to be released on Tuesday by the Government Accountability Office.

As of 2007, the latest year for which comprehensive data on managers was available, women accounted for about 40 percent of managers in the United States work force.

In 2000, women held 39 percent of management positions. Outside of management, women held 49 percent of the jobs in both years.

Across the work force, the gap between what men and women earn has shrunk over the last few decades. Full-time women workers closed the gap to 80.2 cents for every dollar earned by men in 2009, up from just 62.3 cents in 1979.

Much of this persistent wage gap, however, can be explained by what kinds of jobs the sexes are drawn to, whether by choice or opportunity.

The new report, commissioned by the Joint Economic Council of Congress, tries to make a better comparison by looking at men versus women in a specific industry and in similar jobs, and also controlling for differences like education levels and age.

For the full story see:  The New York Times

Millennial Women – What Millennial Women Think

Millennial women – born between 1980 and 1995 – are part of a generation that’s bigger than the baby boomers and more influential. Studies indicate that millennial women believe work-life balance is achievable and don’t see gender bias as an issue. They’re entering a workforce that is 50% women and will soon dominate the workplace. If you’re a millennial woman, how do you see yourself as different from previous generations, and what are your expectations for the future? Share Your Opinions

Working Millennials

If you have not already seen it, I would recommend watching the 60 Minutes show “The Millennials are Coming”. It is an interesting look at the expectations of post-boomer generations. Dr. Twenge has also done some important research in this area. She has been cited as saying, “today’s employees are prepared to take greater risks and are encouraged and rewarded for thinking outside of the box rather than sticking to the traditional ways of doing things.” This can be advantageous, because it steers the organization away from group-think and promotes more of an entrepreneurial atmosphere. I think today’s women are much more open to new challenges. I believe understanding personalities and making adjustments based on having emotional intelligence is going to be a big factor in success and that is why my daughter, Toni Rothpletz, and I wrote our book about understanding personalities in the workplace where we address this issue in the post-boomer generation workforce. www.drdianehamilton.com
—DrDianeHamilton

50 Famous People Who Failed Before Becoming Successful

In my book, How to Reinvent Your Career, I write about how some things we see as failures may actually lead us to something better.  The following is a list of 50 famous people compiled by Katrina Solomon from onlinecollege.org who failed before they became successes:

  1.  Henry Ford
  2.  R. H. Macy
  3.  F. W. Woolworth
  4.  Soichiro Honda
  5.  Akio Morita (Sony)
  6.  Bill Gates
  7.  Harland David Sanders (KFC)
  8.  Walt Disney
  9.  Albert Einstein
  10.  Charles Darwin
  11.  Robert Goddard (rocket researcher)
  12.  Isaac Newton
  13.  Socrates
  14.  Robert Sternberg (President of APA)
  15.  Thomas Edison
  16.  Orville and Wilbur Wright
  17.  Winston Churchill
  18.  Abraham Lincoln
  19.  Oprah Winfrey
  20.  Harry S. Truman
  21.  Dick Cheney
  22.  Jerry Seinfeld
  23.  Fred Astaire
  24.  Sidney Poitier
  25.  Jeanne Moreau (actress)
  26.  Charlie Chaplin
  27.  Lucille Ball
  28.  Harrison Ford
  29.  Marilyn Monroe
  30.  Oliver Stone
  31.  Vincent Van Gogh
  32.  Emily Dickinson
  33.  Theodore Seuss Giesel (Dr. Seuss)
  34.  Charles Schulz
  35.  Steven Spielberg
  36.  Stephen King
  37.  Zane Grey
  38.  J. K. Rowling
  39.  Monet
  40.  Jack London
  41.  Louisa May Alcott
  42.  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  43.  Elvis Presley
  44.  Ludwig van Beethoven
  45.  Igor Stravinsky
  46.  The Beatles
  47.  Michael Jordan
  48.  Stan Smith
  49.  Babe Ruth
  50.  Tom Landry